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Projects

Wolf Creek Dam Rehabilitation

Wolf Creek Dam implemented one of the largest dam grouting programs ever undertaken by the Corps of Engineers.
  • IntelliGrout – part of the long-term fix for Wolf Creek Dam – Gannett Fleming

    Grouting operations were conducted using IntelliGrout, a patented system for collection, monitoring, and analysis of grouting activities. 

Client
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

Location
Russell County, Kentucky

Our Role
Geotechnical Engineering, Geologic Services, Drilling.

Data
Completed
2010
Duration
4 years
Outcomes
  • Constructed a grout curtain and a new concrete diaphragm wall
  • Performed design, technical oversight, and coordination of production drilling for seepage rehabilitation grouting
  • Performed design, technical oversight, and coordination of grouting operations using IntelliGrout.

Wolf Creek Dam is located on the Cumberland River in south central Kentucky and was originally designed and constructed from 1938 to 1952. The 5,736-foot-long dam is a combination rolled earth fill and concrete gravity structure which includes a power-generating station. It has a maximum height of 258 feet above founding level. Lake Cumberland, created by the dam, impounds 6.1 million acre-feet at its maximum pool elevation of 760. It is the largest reservoir east of the Mississippi and the ninth largest in the U.S.

Ongoing seepage problems have been traced to the karst geology of the region, which allows for the dissolution of limestone in the dam’s foundation. The purpose of the project was to reduce the residual permeability of the dam foundation with the installation of two rows of grout curtain within limestone foundation material.

What We Did

Gannett Fleming provided geotechnical engineering and geologic services to the prime contractor, ACT Ltd., and to the Nashville District Corps of Engineers. Our firm performed technical oversight and coordination of exploratory drilling, borehole washing, borehole imaging, permeability testing and pressure grouting with balanced stable high mobility grouts. 

The project included down-the-hole water hammer drilling, water flushing, permeability testing and pressure grouting with balanced stable grout formulations and real time computer monitoring. Additionally, special procedures and grout mixes were developed to treat limestone solution features encountered within the dam foundation. A 5,000-foot-long, 60-foot-wide, and 15-foot-high work platform was designed and constructed on the upstream face of the earthen dam. Designs were also performed for a cantilever steel sheet pile wall, a composite H-pile and steel sheet pile wall, and a soil nail wall. 

Key Features

  • Ongoing seepage problems traced to the karst geology of the region allowed the dissolution of limestone in the dam’s foundation
  • The purpose of the project was to reduce the residual permeability of the dam foundation.

Similar Projects: Water/Wastewater: Dams & Levees, Dams & Levees: Dams Investigation & Design, Geotechnical: Foundations, Geotechnical, Geotechnical: Grouting, Information Technology, Geotechnical: Retaining Walls, Geotechnical: Seepage Remediation, Geotechnical: Site Evaluation