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Projects

Miner Flat Dam

New dam provides a smarter and safer water supply where inadequate systems previously existed.
  • The project requires coordination with the federal government and White Mountain Apache Tribe-Gannett Fleming

    The project requires coordination with the federal government and White Mountain Apache Tribe. 

  • Gannett Fleming’s Matt Morris, PG, takes soil samples at the future site of Miner Flat Dam.

    Gannett Fleming’s Matt Morris, PG, takes soil samples at the future site of Miner Flat Dam.

Client
White Mountain Apache Tribe

Location
White Mountain Indian Reservation, Whiteriver, East Central Arizona

Our Role
Design, Preliminary Site Model, Identifying, Collecting, and Analyzing Data to Characterize Geologic Conditions.

Data
Size
8,620 acre-feet of water
Completed
In Progress
Type
New Construction
Duration
In Progress
Outcomes
  • Long-term water stability and reliability to the Fort Apache Indian Reservation
  • Dramatically improve the quality of life for the Tribe and visitors
  • Creation of as many as 700 new jobs during the construction phase.

Since 1871, the tribal lands of the White Mountain Apache Tribe have been home to the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. Among the top 10 tribal nations in the U.S., this Apache home covers approximately 1.6 million acres, with a population of more than 15,000 people. Approximately 200 miles northeast of Phoenix, Arizona, the area is rich with agricultural opportunities, outdoor recreation, and wildlife. Yet, after more than 140 years of occupying the area, one critical resource has been unreliable or completely absent—water.

Currently, a small well field serves the drinking water needs of the reservation, but production from these wells has declined during the last few years. In December 2010, Congress passed the White Mountain Apache Water Rights Quantification Act, authorizing the Tribe, in accordance with the provisions of the Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Act, to plan, design, and build the White Mountain Apache Rural Water System. Decades in the making, work is underway for a comprehensive water system that will dramatically improve the quality of life for the reservation’s residents and visitors. The new White Mountain Apache Rural Water System is intended to bring long-term water stability and reliability to the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. As part of this larger project, Gannett Fleming is providing design services for a new dam.

What We Did

The new Miner Flat Dam and Reservoir will provide storage of up to 8,620 acre-feet of water as part of a long-term solution for the Tribe’s drinking water shortages. The roller-compacted concrete dam (RCC) dam will be constructed approximately 7.5 miles from the intersection of Highway 260 and Indian Route 73. It will be approximately 160 feet in height with a crest length of about 450 feet for storage of water to be released downstream to the new water treatment plant. The water treatment plant will treat 12.4 million gallons per day, and the 60-mile long water distribution system will deliver domestic, commercial, municipal, and industrial water to the 30,000 residents of 15 communities located along a 113-mile stretch of the White Mountains.   

Key Features

  • RCC dam will be approximately 160 feet in height with a crest length of about 450 feet
  • Water will released downstream to the new water treatment plant, which will treat 12.4 million gallons per day
  • The 60-mile long water distribution system will deliver water to the 30,000 residents of 15 communities located along a 113-mile stretch of the White Mountains.

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