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Holy Name of Jesus Church

Reused historic elements give Holy Name of Jesus Church a classic and sustainable design.
  • Stained glass windows and paint add beauty to the Holy Name of Jesus Church-Gannett Fleming

    Deep yellow paint with red and royal blue accents pick up the hues of the stained glass.

  • Reused statues and light fixtures were used at Holy Name of Jesus Church-Gannett Fleming

    Statues and light fixtures were reused from the former church.

Client
Holy Name of Jesus Parish
Location
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Our Role
Architecture, Geotechnical, Structural, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection.
Data
Size:
26,000 square feet
Construction Cost:
$8 million
Completed:
2011
Type:
New Construction
Duration:
2 years
Outcomes
  • New church replaces an outgrown facility, which was converted to a social hall
  • Reuse of historic elements preserves antiques.

Founded in 1960, the Holy Name of Jesus Parish in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was quickly outgrowing its church and spaces for social and instructional activities. Gannett Fleming designed a new church to replace the outdated facility, which was converted to a social hall and meeting rooms.

What We Did

Gannett Fleming provided architectural, geotechnical, structural, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection, as well as coordinated the civil/site, mechanical, and liturgical consulting services. Worshipers sitting in the 1,400-seat traditional Roman Catholic sanctuary appreciate the lack of view-blocking columns. The sanctuary’s support comes from the two main trusses that enable the space to be clear-spanned and column-free. Optimal acoustics were achieved by incorporating baffles into the walls and ceiling, placing acoustical tiles in the front of the sanctuary, and padding the pews. The walls throughout the church are painted a deep yellow with red and royal blue accents to pick up the brilliant hues of the stained glass.

Reuse of historic elements was an important part of the church’s design. Its 41 German-made stained glass windows came from a closed Catholic church in Connecticut; the ornate Italian marble altar dating to 1921 once graced a girls’ school in Washington, D.C.; the tabernacle was purchased online through a company specializing in recycled church items; and statues and light fixtures were reused from the former church. Beyond the interior aesthetics and exterior massing, the design effort involved a site plan for the church and its many functions – including religious education classes, organization meetings, athletic programs, and the adjacent Holy Name of Jesus School. The site plan was adapted so all pedestrians, especially children, can walk between the school, gymnasium, playground, and church without crossing a parking lot or traffic.

Key Features

  • New traffic pattern creates safe drop-off zone for adjacent school
  • Salvage of important religious items and materials protect rich pieces of history.

Sustainability Features & Outcomes

  • Recycled light fixtures and windows keeps waste out of landfills.

Similar Projects: Acoustics, Architecture, Facilities: Civil/Site Development, Engineering, Facilities, Engineering: Facilities, Geotechnical, Facilities: Mechanical, Facilities: Religious, Facilities: Structural