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Goethals Switching Station

Separation of two legs of a 345 kilovolt feeder into separate circuits increases load capacity.
  • Infrastructure updates increase power transfer capability and reduce existing bottlenecks-Gannett Fleming

    Infrastructure updates increase power transfer capability and reduce existing bottlenecks.

Client
Consolidated Edison, Inc. (Con Edison)
Location
New York, New York
Our Role
Design, Construction.
Data
Completed:
2014
Type:
Rehabilitation
Outcomes
  • Enhanced power delivery capacity in the heart of an urban area
  • Improved reliability and resiliency of the feeders
  • Improved durability reduces long-term maintenance costs.

In an effort to increase load capacity and meet the needs of its customers, Con Edison hired Gannett Fleming to provide design and support services to separate two legs – L&M – of the G23 345 kilovolt feeder. The feeders are underground, oil filled, pipe-type cables. Major substation renovations at the Goethals switchyard on Staten Island, N.Y., and the Linden Co-Generation switchyard in New Jersey, owned by General Electric, were necessary for this project.   

What We Did

At the Linden Co-Generation site, our team used gas insulated switchgear systems. This technology allows the equipment to be installed on a much smaller footprint and inside a building – as opposed to the conventional approach of having all equipment outdoors on concrete foundations. The Goethals switchyard utilizes conventional air-insulated switchgear equipment.

Key Features

  • Separating two legs of a 345 kilovolt feeder into separate circuits 
  • Gas insulated switchgear configuration because of space constants.

Sustainability Features & Outcomes

  • Updated equipment leads to an improved level of safety
  • Compact design reduces space requirements
  • High reliability reduces long-term maintenance needs and costs.

Similar Projects: Facilities: Corporate/Commercial, Facilities: Electrical, Engineering, Facilities, Power, Engineering: Power, Power: Power Delivery